John Gaynard on Creativity & Innovation

Here is a recommended post from John Gaynard’s engagement with the UK’s Open University Business School …

national cultures manage to show the same signs of difference from each over the centuries. For example, Philippe d’Iribarne who studied French, Dutch and American factories of the same American company then wrote a book called “The Logic of Honour” in which he demonstrated quite well (or at least to my satisfaction) that French people continued to demonstrate in the 20th century the same logic of honor that was seen at Agincourt and Crecy. The Dutch have managed to transmit to each other for centuries the love of consensus for which they are well known and admired. And what seems to motivate American and British working cultures is the search for a “fair deal”. You can learn more about d’Iribarne’s recent research at this page:
http://www.syre.com/French_Strangeness.htm

Links to Susan Blackmore & and relevant NYT article too.  Check it.

The Art of Memetic by Wes Unruh & Edward Wilson

Hey Wes & Edward!  What happened to that conversation that we were having?

All – click below to get Wes & Edward’s book:

The Art of Memetics: Memes, Meme Theory, Memetic Marketing

Memetic Takeover

Just some Po for thinking about brands:

Twitter Matters #4: social capital discussion evolving

Okay, now seriously!  It is nice to have amusing examples like the one below of how a meme can spread via twitter.

Pointing out a memetic trigger like a “violation of viewing habits” is valuable to this idea of memetic brand building.

But check out this, perhaps more complex example, of twitter being at the heart of the development of shared perception.  Click here to see the whole discussion.

vibemetrix and JBordeaux could of had a discussion like this in person, over the telephone, via email or IM.  But they never knew each other until this conversation broke out.

a chat about social capital

a chat about social capital

That is significant in a number of ways.

1. Their Twitter use made their interests and expertise findable so that they could quickly and easily explore the idea together.

2. Twitter made their exchange findable by others, who could quickly add to the development of the idea or at least follow their thinking.

3. Many who were not trying to find the related discussion have been “infected” with the thinking because they are followers of the users involved in the exchange.  In this case, that may have added up to thousands, with little or no effort on behalf of the original thinkers.  Even though these two users are working at the genesis of an idea, they are thought leaders.

Whether observers accept or reject their thinking is one thing.  The cool point is that they don’t have to go through that thinking learning curve in the same way for themselves.  They have a memetic blueprint to work forward with.

I think there are many productivity breakthroughs to explore along these lines that we are only beginning to see the potential of.

I would be interested in hearing thoughts on why Twitter seems more exciting and/or useful than forums?  Forums also enable people to find topics and related discussions but they always frustrate the hell out of me.  I expect to find what I am looking for, but never can.

Maybe it is because on Twitter, I find what I am not looking for and it is related discussion?

Great comment below by Kim Patrick Kobza, CEO, Neighborhood America re: cognitive outliers, real time group cognition

Update:

I have turned my evolving reflections about twitter into a series of posts.  Catch the other thoughts:

Why Twitter Matters #1: Follow me, Follow You on Twitter

Why Twitter Matters #2: Memetic Logos

Why Twitter Matters #3: Escalopter

Why Twitter Matters #5: Twitter and Social Capital

Why Twitter Matters #6: Twitter Love Song

Twitter Matters #7: Twitter Bot Auto-Debate

UPDATE@Nov.4, 2008 – an overview of StockTwits from Stowe Boyd.

UPDATE@Dec.1, 2008 – Tim O’Reilly “Why I Love Twitter”

Twitter Matters #3: Escalopter (escalator + helicopter)

Now that I have used Twitter for a while, I am more convinced than when I started that it is an example, along with activity feeds & other microblogging platforms, of a new medium that is particularly suited for memetic branding purposes.  It is involved in the genesis of shared perception.

Picked up on twitter …

MarkusvonRoder: Demonstrating the memetic trigger “Violation of viewing habits” – the Escalopter (escalator + helicopter)

Update:

I have turned my evolving reflections about twitter into a series of posts.  Catch the other thoughts:

Why Twitter Matters #1: Follow me, Follow You on Twitter

Why Twitter Matters #2: Memetic Logos

Why Twitter Matters #4: social capital discussion evolving

Comment, Kim Patrick Kobza, CEO, Neighborhood America: cognitive outliers, real time group cognition

Why Twitter Matters #5: Twitter and Social Capital

Why Twitter Matters #6: Twitter Love Song

Twitter Matters #7: Twitter Bot Auto-Debate

UPDATE@Nov.4, 2008 – an overview of StockTwits from Stowe Boyd.

UPDATE@Dec.1, 2008 – Tim O’Reilly “Why I Love Twitter”

Canadian Marketing Association Digital Marketing Conference 2008

Where r we @ CMA

In prep for leading the Social Marketing round table at last week’s Canadian Marketing Association Digital Marketing Conference I asked “What are the top three topics of discussion in social media today?” on Twitter and LinkedIn.

I received about 35 responses within a few days, with over 85 references to topics. Over 30 responses came from LinkedIn within 24 hours from all over the USA. The main issues were reflected as we went around the table at the conference.

Keep in mind that the folks on Twitter & tuned into LinkedIn answers are probably a little further along the adoption curve wrt social marketing than most.

In theory they might have blinders on … be more optimistic about how far along in adoption we are wrt to social media.

However, I think the responses indicates that it is still early days.  There were 23 references to obtaining internal buy-in for the adoption of social marketing and almost as many (21) for demonstrating ROI and measurement.  Aren’t these really the same thing?  All about getting the folks at the top to see the value proposition.

We have moved beyond the early innovators. That is good news. But we are still a bunch of early adoptors trying to make the case to the early majority.

That is what Social Capital Value Add is all about.

The tsunami of mass adoption is still ahead.