Cdling: building trust

We have extended our closed Alpha Group from our HTML5 mobile version onto the web.

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Last week we poked up our heads to make an alpha release of our Cdling Scores. With the chart available at that link, you can quickly and easily see that Jason Calacanis has great instincts when it comes to assembling a diverse judging panel of established investors, Founders and influential analysts.

The same applies to helping investors in Ontario or the UK or Germany or NYC or Chicago or Asia or anywhere … build trust faster with investors in Silicon Valley.  Cdling Scores tell you a lot about a player in innovation at a glance.

Folks who took the time to check out the chart were galvanized by the insight.

Pulitzer prize winning Forbes journalist George Anders ask us to use Cdling Scores to compare the existing influence of the PayPalMafia with the emerging Facebook Friends.  With this kind of insight, the PayPalers can make better decisions about who they might co-invest with from the Facebook folks to help insure that they keep getting chances to get in on the best deals and have the best connections to help their existing portfolio of startups succeed.

We are grateful to Christine Wong at ITCanada for writing about what we are doing in an informed and entertaining way. And to her Associate Editor Brian Jackson for understanding that even when you are introducing a way for everyone to win, it is really, really hard to get folks to support a new approach.

Should I Change My Avatar? A Social Media Cultural Trip

Please click on this link & wiegh in.

Richard Florida, Roger Martin & Barry Wellman all have an opinion, I would like you to express yours!

UPDATE: five to six hours later …

So I weaved conformity & nonconformity, MySpace, Twitter & Facebook culture, innovation & creativity, the struggling artist/entrepreneur, Richard Florida & Roger Martin’s prescription for the Ontario economy & Barry Wellman’s thesis of networked individualism into one post http://bit.ly/utM1.

I had hoped it was a social media experience.  As in, are you experienced? This music should really be playing in the background while you review this.  Memetic Brand blog readers won’t be really entertained until they have the Hendrix, the MySpace blog post, the Florida post & and Wellman paper all open at the same time :) .

Some pretty interesting results.

It looks like I lost 30 followers immediately upon posting the question to twitter.

Qwitter reports that this tweet two hours before the time of notifications is the tweet that lost them. But the time of posting the question, “Should I Change My Avatar” with a link to the post & the time of receipt from emails from Qwitter are almost the same.  Has anyone else noticed Qwitter is not accurate?

It was a shameful question to ask or folks are just fed up my drivel.  Either way, obviously a notable breach of culture.

The link in the twitter post received quite a bit of attention, http://bit.ly/info/utM1.  Over 60 clicks.  So a lot more people read the post than qwit.

Both the readers & qwitters are about half from Canada & the United States.  Dunno if you can make a cultural observation from this?

Thanks to a few friends who played the game and spoke up on the side of reason.

I have changed my avatar.

Does this tell you more or less about me?

I can’t tell the difference.  Can you tell the difference?

(Forget for a moment that the former avatar was crafted 111 years ago, in another medium, for a different application :)

In any event, I do hope that this has been an interesting experience in social media.

I hope that we can all relate to each other better now.

Clearly I should have done this a long time ago.